About Us

Who We Are:
The Cento is the only newspaper for Centre College in Danville, KY. The Cento publishes every other Thursday, not including College holidays and breaks. Our staff is composed entirely of Centre College students with all reporting, photography, design, and management handled by the staff. Funding for the publication is provided by Centre College and generous alumni, with additional funding generated through the publication’s advertisements and annual subscribers.

What We Publish:
As a College newspaper, the Cento‘s mission has developed into two main parts. First, the Cento and its staff seeks to provide its readers with the latest news pertaining to Centre College, Danville, and, if applicable, the national and international communities. Second, the Cento and its staff aspires to bring the voice and opinions of the student body to the Centre College faculty, staff, and administration. The newspaper’s main sections are defined as News, Opinions, Features, Arts & Leisure, and Sports.

History of the Cento:

The Cento began in 1859 as The Centre College Magazine. However, the publication came to an abrupt end in 1861 as the Civil War entered into Kentucky and descended upon Centre College. With Kentucky as a border-state, Centre students fought on both sides and the famous Old Centre building served as a resting place for sick soldiers. By the end of the war, the Centre College Magazine was long forgotten.

Finally, in October of 1887, the Cento first appeared as a magazine-style publication put together by the Literary Society. The first edition included an Editorial by the Editor-in-Chief detailing the need and purpose of the Cento. Over the next few decades the publication evolved until 1930 when the Cento had transitioned to a full newspaper style publication. Below is the Editorial announcing the formation of the Cento, printed in October of 1891.

“Centre College though the oldest institution of learning in the Southwest, has not since 1861, thirty years ago, had an established College journal. In those good old days ‘befoah de wah,’ the magazine was under the control of the Literary Societies, and year by year competent men were selected by them to compose the editorial staff. Thus was maintained a paper well worthy to be the literary exponent of an institution of Centre’s standing. The great civil conflict was disastrous alike to college and magazine; and though our dear Alma Mater has long since emerged from the darkness and glom of that sad period into the pure light of peace and renewed prosperity, yet the re-establishment of her magazine has been up to this hour an unrealized hope. At times most worthy efforts have been made to found a journal that would fill the place of the old ‘Centre College Magazine.’ Experience and the example of sister institutions have conclusively proven private enterprise inadequate to the perpetuation of a college magazine, and to insure its permanency the Societies, the center of our literary effort have again encircled it with maternal care. Since the first appearance of the ‘Oracle,’ three years ago, an ardent and growing interest in this good work has been evinced among our students, and as we come to take up again and continue the same, we trust that there will be Aarons and Hurs to uphold our hands, that our cause may prevail. ‘Tis true, perhaps, that all youth inexperienced in journalistic pursuits have a tinge of what is termed vanitas scriptorum, since every one must agree with Byron that it’s ‘Pleasant, surely, to see one’s name in print;’ yet we trust that this juvenile ardor may, in our case at least, be turned to good account.” -Lucien V. Rule, Class of 1893, First Editor-in-Chief of the Cento. 

 

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The first issue of the Cento (1891).

Old Paper by ThunderThemes.net